PORSCHE 935 VINTAGE LIVERIES

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The new Porsche 935 is a proper throwback to the era of Porsche motorsport domination. It only makes sense, then, that the automaker would let the new 935’s lucky buyers choose from a number of different vintage liveries, each playing an important role somewhere in Porsche’s history.

Porsche this week unveiled a slate of designs for the 935. Seven different designs are on offer, each pulled from the annals of history (not just the 935’s, either) and given a modernizing by Grant Larson and Porsche’s design team. The designs are obviously modified a fair bit, removing the corporate sponsorship and focusing on the color choices that make each of these designs easy to discern from a distance.

Each livery’s look is based on the Martini & Rossi design, with broad, sweeping stripes rising from the front bumper to the top of the fenders, running all the way to the rear wing. The only exception here is the Salzburg livery, with Porsche keeping the white stripes around the headlights that was first seen on the Le Mans-winning Porsche 917 in 1970. It also made an appearance on Porsche’s modern-day 917 concept.

Some of the motifs will be immediately recognizable to motorsport fans of all shapes and sizes. Gulf’s hallowed orange-and-blue getup has been on everything from FordGTs to the Porsche 917 that won the World Sportscar Championship in 1970 and 1971. The same goes for Momo’s iconic red-and-yellow look, as well as John Player Special’s black-and-gold treatment.

Others might be a bit more niche. Sachs’ blue-and-white look adorned a 935 that won the 1980 12 Hours of Sebring. Interscope’s “bacon” stripes will be recognizable to 935 fans, thanks in part to its win at the 1981 24 Hours of Daytona. My personal favorite has to be the turquoise-heavy Valliant livery, though, bringing some atypical colors together to great effect.

No matter what it looks like, though, the new 935 is going to be a monster. Only 77 will be built, and they won’t be road-legal, which means they’re just expensive track toys for well-heeled buyers. Underneath the 935-derived bodywork is the powertrain from the GT2 RS, which means each car is good for about 700 horsepower. Each new 935 will cost about $800,000.

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