MALE BOOTY GAINS

Bigger, stronger glutes help you run faster and lift more weight in some lower-body exercises. Big booty men are also at less risk for lower back pain. Some people also find bigger glutes more aesthetically pleasing.

Glute Muscle Anatomy

When you refer to the glutes, you’re usually talking about the gluteus maximus, which is the biggest muscle in the body. It’s the visible muscle that makes up the bulk of someone’s rear-end. However, there are actually three glute muscles.

The gluteus maximus spans the backside of your hip bone and runs down into your femur. It also connects to the iliotibial band, which is a thick band of tissue that runs down the side of your leg. There are two more glute muscles: the gluteus medius and minimus.

The gluteus medius runs along the side of your hip and is much less visible than the maximus. The gluteus minimus also runs along the side of your hip bone and inserts into the femur.

Your glute muscles extend your hip and lift your leg to the side, a movement known as abduction. They also help rotate your leg. The gluteus maximus is the biggest and most powerful of the three muscles and the most important when it comes to things like running and lifting weights.

Advantages of Bigger Glutes

Sprinting requires hip extension, so much so that building up stronger glutes can actually make you faster. An August 2018 study published in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine showed that some weighted glute exercises can help improve sprint performance. Sprinting is important in many sports, so men who want to increase their athletic performance should do glute exercises.

For male athletes, performance is important. However, you don’t need to be an athlete to benefit from glute training. If you’re a man who suffers from lower back pain, glute exercises can help. An August 2017 study published in the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health & Fitness Journaldiscussed the importance of glute strengthening exercises in managing lower back pain.

In the article, the authors explain that stronger glute muscles help you move and lift with less effort, reducing strain on your lower back. Stronger glutes can also improve your posture, which can help reduce lower back pain.

1. The Hip Thrust

To build bigger glutes, you should perform an exercise that activates the glutes and allows you to easily add resistance: the barbell hip thrust. A December 2015 study published in the Journal of Applied Biomechanics showed that the barbell hip thrust activates the glutes more than a barbell back squat. The latter is a well-known lower-body strength exercise, but the barbell hip thrust is better at specifically targeting the glutes.

  1. Use a bench or box that won’t tip over. It should be heavy or securely fastened to the ground. Whatever object you use should be 16 inches highand flat on top. 
  2. Sit in front of the box or bench with your mid-back resting on the edge. 
  3. Place a barbell on your lap. You can rest a pad on your lap between your body and the barbell, or use a bar pad that wraps around the bar. This will protect your hip bones as you’re doing the thrust. 
  4. Place your hands on the barbell. 
  5. Bend your knees and plant your feet flat on the ground. 
  6. Lean back and thrust your hips up, pressing through your heels. 
  7. Bring your hips up as high as possible. At the top, your body should form a straight line from your knees to your shoulders. Your knees should be bent at 90 degrees. 
  8. Relax and put the barbell down.

Tip

Try this exercise without a barbell if you’re not sure how much weight you can lift.

2. Other Glute-Building Resistance Exercises

While the barbell hip thrust is one of the best gluteus maximus exercises, you should switch things up and add variety to your booty-building workout routine.

Move 1: Step-Ups

Step-ups can be used as part of your glute-building routine. Use a box to step on and some dumbbells or kettlebells to add resistance.

  1. Place a box with a flat surface on the ground. 
  2. Put one foot on the top of the box. 
  3. Step up so that you’re standing on the box. 
  4. Step back with the same foot you used to step up. Switch sides when you’ve completed your desired number of repetitions. You can hold dumbbells or kettlebells by your sides to add resistance.

Tip

If this exercise is too difficult, use a shorter box or drop the weights.

Move 2: Barbell Back Squat

While it’s not quite as effective as the hip thrust, the barbell back squat can help you build your glutes. You’ll need a barbell and a power rack for this exercise.

  1. To start, put the bar over your upper back and grab it with both hands, wider than shoulder-width apart. 
  2. Lift the bar out of the rack and take a step back. 
  3. Set your feet slightly wider than hip-width apart and turn your toes out slightly. 
  4. Squat down, keeping your feet flat on the ground. 
  5. Go as low as you can; then stand back up.

Tip

You can hold a light kettlebell in front of your chest to squat instead of using a barbell if the exercise is uncomfortable.

3. Unweighted Glute Exercises

Beginners or men suffering from lower back pain who aren’t ready to touch weights can use isolated glute exercises.

Move 1: The Clam

The clam is one of the best exercises for activating the glutes if you don’t want to use weights.

  1. Take an elastic band and place it around your knees. 
  2. Lie on your side with your knees bent and legs stacked on top of each other. 
  3. The bottom leg should be on the ground. Lift your top knee off of the bottom knee while keeping your feet together. Don’t turn your body to lift up, simply raise your top leg as high as you can. 
  4. Lower it back down slowly and under control; Your legs should look like a clam opening and closing its shell. 

Tip

Remove the resistance band if you can’t raise your leg with correct technique.

Move 2: Side Plank

To work the gluteus medius, you can do a side plankwith your top leg raised.

  1. Start by lying on your side with your forearm on the ground. 
  2. Lift your hips up so that you’re in a side plank position with your body in a straight line and legs stacked on top of each other. 
  3. Lift your top leg up and hold it in the air as long as you can and then switch sides.

Tip

Don’t raise your top leg if that makes the exercise too difficult.

BOOTY BUILDING FOR MEN

Generally speaking, nobody likes leg day. But we can all agree that lower-body workouts are the most beneficial in the grand scheme, providing the body with a tidal wave of muscle-building hormones and, of course, helping us all look better in shorts.

Aside from boosting your body’s muscle-building biology, leg workouts – especially those targeting the glutes, the most powerful muscles in your body – can also deliver some worthwhile functional and preventative benefits.

“Strengthening this area will help the hips and take pressure off the knees,” says Daniel Giordano, D.P.T., C.S.C.S., co-founder of Bespoke Treatments Physical Therapy and Fitness.

That said, if you don’t train your legs or glutes often (let’s say, at least once a week), you’ll want to ease yourself in.

“If you’re like most office workers, you sit on one of your most valuable resources most of the day, leaving you with what I like to call ‘dead ass,’” says Matt Sauerhoff, founder of The LIV Method, a New York City-based personal training service.

The more time you spend sitting, the tighter and weaker your hips and glutes get, respectively, making you more susceptible to sustaining an injury.

“Remember, it’s all about the long game,” Sauerhoff says. “Take your time, restore balance, and move intelligently.”

The next time you roll up to the weight room for leg day – or even if you’re just looking for a lower-body workout that you can do at home (see “Essential Gear,” below) – pull up this list of exercises.

RELATED: Here’s What You Should Be Doing Instead Of Back Squats

Why Glute Training Is More Than Just Getting A Great Ass

The glutes are the largest and strongest muscles in your body, and are responsible for the extension, abduction, and external rotation of the hips, as well as the posterior pelvic tilt. Bigger, stronger glutes can help improve posture, movement, and athletic performance, while reducing the risk of a wide array of injuries.

Our larger glute muscles are one of the main reasons why humans can stand upright. They help us walk, run, sprint, jump, change direction, and much more. They also play a key role in our overall health, as strong glutes decrease the risk for injuries in the knees, lower back, hamstrings, groin, and hips. In fact, most lower back pain is a direct result of weak glutes and/or hamstrings.

So not only is a nice set of glutes more aesthetically pleasing, it’s also better for your body. Let’s take a look at the best exercises to improve glute strength, size, and function.

The Best Exercises For A Stronger, Healthier, Head-Turning Ass

Squats

It should come as no surprise that squats are first on this list. You’d be hard-pressed to find a better exercise for building a great ass than squatting.

The great thing about squats is that there are a ton of different variations that help sculpt the perfect posterior. Let’s take a look at each of them.

Few exercises allow you to hit the glutes and hamstrings with more volume than the barbell squat. This is what makes it so effective for building a great ass.

A few notes on barbell squats:

  • A common debate when it comes to squats is whether you should use a high or low bar position. A high bar allows you to squat deeper, which will hit the glutes harder, while a low bar position causes more forward lean, which also lets you hit the glutes and hamstrings more. So bar position is really a matter of personal preference.
  • Your stance also affects how much the glutes and hamstrings are worked. A wider stance (further than shoulder width) will target them more.

RELATED: Drop The Weights And Hit This Bodyweight Workout For Stronger Legs

Goblet Squat

The goblet squat is done with a dumbbell or kettlebell held at your chest. While you can’t use real heavy loads with this variation, the goblet squat allows you to get a lot of depth, further targeting the glutes and hamstrings.

Bottoms-Up Squat

This variation goes by a few different names, including the Anderson Squat. Basically, you’re only doing the second half of a squat.

To do this variation, set the bar up in a rack on the pins, equal to where it would be at the bottom of your squat. Position yourself under the bar, and explode up. Lower the bar back onto the pins, and reset. No bouncing.

This variation is great because it eliminates the stretch-shortening cycle between the eccentric and concentric portions of the squat and isolates the glutes and hamstrings.

Bulgarian Split Squat

Also known as the rear-foot elevated split squat, the Bulgarian split squat targets the glutes, as well as the quads. This variation can be done with dumbbells, goblet style, or with a barbell.

Deadlifts

Like the squat, there are a number of deadlift variations that allow you to really hammer the glutes.

Conventional & Sumo

Deadlifts are great, not only because they are a total body movement, but they also are incredibly effective for building the glutes and hamstrings, due to the ability to use very heavy loads. Research shows that conventional and sumo deadlifts are both equally effective for training the glutes. The important thing to remember when deadlifting is to really squeeze the glutes hard at the top part of the movement.

Single-Leg Deadlifts

There’s no better way to build strength and stability than with unilateral movements. The single-leg RDL will really set the glutes and hammies on fire by providing a ton of isolation.

Hip Thrusts

Barbell Hip Thrust

It might be one of the more embarrassing exercises to perform, but the hip thrust is a fantastic one for butt-building and should not be left out of your program. Popularised by Bret Contreras, the hip thrust involves placing your shoulders on a bench, with a loaded barbell over your hips. Here’s Bret himself explaining the movement.

Single-Leg Hip Thrust

When it comes to the glutes, there aren’t many bodyweight exercises I would choose over weighted exercises, but the single-leg hip thrust is one of the exceptions. Like the barbell hip thrust, your shoulders are placed on a bench, with your feet planted firmly on the ground. Extend one leg straight out and thrust your hips into the air, driving your one planted foot into the ground, and squeezing your glutes at the top.

Lunges

While lunges are primarily thought of as a quad-dominant exercise, the glutes are heavily involved in helping you return to the standing position. Lunges can be done forward, or reverse, with a barbell or dumbbells.